Training and Timing When to Eat

One of the questions I get asked a lot is “how do I figure out what to eat before and after I train?”

Here are the guidelines I give my athletes to devise their pre, intra (during), and post training fueling strategies.

Pre-Training

If you’re able to eat before you train, shoot to consume 30 to 40 grams of easily digested carbs (think bananas, rice, toast), 20 to 30 grams of easily digested protein, and no more than 10 to 20 grams of fat 90 minutes to 2 hours before your session.

This could look like a scoop of protein, a banana, and a Perfect Bar.  

Longer than 2 hours and you run the risk of the food being digested and not available for immediate use. Less than 90 minutes and you run the risk of it still being in your stomach and causing cramps and/or nausea.

This is also when studies show it is the most effective time to be consuming 20 g of whey protein (counted as your protein intake) rather than after you train.

Adjustments and modifications to these guidelines:

If you train early in the AM and can’t eat- make sure your dinner the night before is heavily loaded with carbs so that your system has as much glycogen (the storage form of glucose) as possible on board.

Play around with what feels best. I can practically eat a whole pizza then go run- others are sensitive when they even have a small amount of food in their stomachs. The goal is to provide your body with readily available fuel, and everyone is different.

During Your Workout (Intra Training)

If you’re training more than 90 minutes you should be refueling mid session. Aim for 20 to 40 grams of carbs (less if you are only doing 90 minutes, more if you are doing over 90 minutes). I highly encourage athletes to drink a sports drink with carbs in it, eat a banana or orange, or to supplement with dextrose or similar carb supplement. 

This is again something you will need to play around with some, and day to day you may notice you need more or less carbs. Lack of sleep, how long the individual training pieces are, stress, and how heavy the loads are will all affect your carb needs. 

After Your Workout (Post Training)

You should be consuming a minimum of 40 to 60 grams of protein, 40 to 60 grams of carbs, and a max of 20 to 30 grams of fat (the less the better) in your post workout meal (assuming you are training once a day). 

Contrary to popular myth, your body will not excrete excess protein. If you eat more than your body needs it will simply convert it to fat, as it does carbs and dietary fat.

Make sure you’re getting enough– your body needs it to repair the “damage” you did during training. Your protein intake should be at a gram per pound of body weight minimum per day. I suggest, if you digest it okay, to have another scoop of protein immediately after training then fill in the rest with lean meats in your meal.

Carbs post training can come from any source. I like my athletes to have some carbs right away (a banana or a bar on the way home) then have rice or potatoes in their meal.

Fats you want to keep low- you are trying to get protein and carbs to your muscles, and fats slow down digestion. It can be a balancing act to get in enough protein while minimizing fat, but if you don’t add three pounds of bacon and cheese to your meal, you should be okay.

Questions:

What if I train two or three times a day?
Break your macros up so that you are getting at least 20 grams of carbs and 20 grams of protein before and after every session. Then spread out the rest over the course of the day.

What if I’m not hungry right after training?
Too bad- eat anyways. Get in the habit of having a small snack within 20 minutes of being done, then by the time you get home your system will be primed for more.

What if I’m at the gym longer than I expected and I don’t have anything to eat?
This is not a big deal if it happens on a rare occasion- but don’t make a habit of it. If you can at the very least get a FitAid or stash a sports drink in your gym bag. Training increases cortisol levels, cortisol breaks down muscle, and in the absence of glucose/carbs to protect muscle break down, cortisol is going to go to town. Protect your gains!

Have more questions? Post them here and I will help you!

 

Want to know how much you should be eating? Need help staying on track? Check out my options for Nutrition Coaching!

My mission is to help everyone I can become the healthiest, strongest versions of themselves. I am a Crossfit coach, athlete, Health and Nutrition coach, Movement Rehab Specialist, and a grad student completing my masters in Kinesiology with a focus on integrative wellness.

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